Rhythm And Blues

Early rock & roll derived the lion's share of its en-ergy and inspiration from black music. In the Fif-ties "rock & roll" was often taken to be simply a new name for "rhythm & blues," or "R&B," the music industry's generic term for any popular music primarily produced and consumed by African-Americans.

The R&B scene of the early Fifties was diverse enough to accommodate the suave stylings of a Charles Brown, the earthy, fiery Chicago blues of a Muddy Waters and everything in between. But when one thinks today of R&B in the early Fifties, it's usually the vocal groups that first come to mind—the Drifters, the Dominoes, the Midnighters, so many more. During those years, the years just before rock & roll became a worldwide phenomenon, a new en-ergy came into black vocal group music. In the For-ties it had been dominated by the Ravens, the Orioles and other groups that sang love songs sweet and low, after the fashion of the Ink Spots, who became world famous just before World War II.

Around 1950, though, certain R&B vocal groups began moving away from the sweet tones of the Ink Spots' Bill Kenny and toward something much closer to the sanctified shouts of such contemporary gospel groups as the Soul Stirrers, the Pilgrim Trav-elers and the Swan Silvertones. For some in the black community, this was tan-tamount to blasphemy. The new mix of gospel-style singing, sensual R&B rhythms and risque lyrics on such trend-setting records as "Honey Love" by the Drifters and "Work with Me Annie" by the Mid-nighters was as outrageous to conservatives as the rap excesses of 2 Live Crew would be some thirty-five years later.

(When Sam Cooke launched his pop career in 1957 after six years of singing pure gospel with the Soul Stirrers, the schism among his fans was deeper and more permanent even than what happened among Bob Dylan's folk fans after he went electric in 1965.) For young R&B fans, though—blacks and whites—this was electrifying stuff...

Early rock & roll derived the lion's share of its en-ergy and inspiration from black music. In the Fif-ties "rock & roll" was often taken to be simply a new name for "rhythm & blues,"... read more »
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Rhythm And Blues

Early rock & roll derived the lion's share of its en-ergy and inspiration from black music. In the Fif-ties "rock & roll" was often taken to be simply a new name for "rhythm & blues," or "R&B," the music industry's generic term for any popular music primarily produced and consumed by African-Americans.

The R&B scene of the early Fifties was diverse enough to accommodate the suave stylings of a Charles Brown, the earthy, fiery Chicago blues of a Muddy Waters and everything in between. But when one thinks today of R&B in the early Fifties, it's usually the vocal groups that first come to mind—the Drifters, the Dominoes, the Midnighters, so many more. During those years, the years just before rock & roll became a worldwide phenomenon, a new en-ergy came into black vocal group music. In the For-ties it had been dominated by the Ravens, the Orioles and other groups that sang love songs sweet and low, after the fashion of the Ink Spots, who became world famous just before World War II.

Around 1950, though, certain R&B vocal groups began moving away from the sweet tones of the Ink Spots' Bill Kenny and toward something much closer to the sanctified shouts of such contemporary gospel groups as the Soul Stirrers, the Pilgrim Trav-elers and the Swan Silvertones. For some in the black community, this was tan-tamount to blasphemy. The new mix of gospel-style singing, sensual R&B rhythms and risque lyrics on such trend-setting records as "Honey Love" by the Drifters and "Work with Me Annie" by the Mid-nighters was as outrageous to conservatives as the rap excesses of 2 Live Crew would be some thirty-five years later.

(When Sam Cooke launched his pop career in 1957 after six years of singing pure gospel with the Soul Stirrers, the schism among his fans was deeper and more permanent even than what happened among Bob Dylan's folk fans after he went electric in 1965.) For young R&B fans, though—blacks and whites—this was electrifying stuff...

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New Orleans Rock 'n' Roll Party (CD)
Various: New Orleans Rock 'n' Roll Party (CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7045

Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(1997/Night Train) 23 Tracks (53:00), 1955-1959. This set is dedicated to recording and mixing engineer, and studio owner Cosimo Matassa. He's invented that 'Cosmo Sounds', the trademark sound of New Orleans! Pure Louisiana Rock'n'Roll!
$11.81 $18.94
Legendary Labels Of Louisiana - The Best Of Sapphire (CD)
Various: Legendary Labels Of Louisiana - The Best Of... Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7026

only 2x still available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(1996/NIGHT TRAIN) 16 tracks 1954-59 (39:46) - Rare and previously unreissued New Orleans Rock & Roll and Vocal Group recordings. Including ultra rare gems like 'Hound Dog Blues', 'Geraldine', the jive blaster 'Jukebox Boogie Woogie...
$18.94
An Introduction To: Night Train To New Orleans (2-CD)
Various: An Introduction To: Night Train To New Orleans... Art-Nr.: CDNTICD2008

only 1x still available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(2001/NIGHT TRAIN) 40 tracks, taken from various Night Train and Funky Delicacies re-issue albums. Rare original sealed mint copy!
$23.69 $29.63
Night Train Keyboard Kings - Sampler (2-CD)
Various: Night Train Keyboard Kings - Sampler (2-CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTICD2009

only 1x still available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(2001/NIGHT TRAIN) 35 tracks from the vaults of Night Train re-issues
$11.81 $17.75
The Hoss Allen Sessions (CD)
The Treniers: The Hoss Allen Sessions (CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTI7120

only 1x still available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(2004/Night Train) 23 tracks (77:12) 1963-64 'Hermitage' with 12 page booklet. - Two original LPs on one CD. Swinging, hysterical and entertaining live shows, produced by Hoss Allen. Wild stuff.
$23.69
Walkin' The Bullfrog (CD)
Lenny Lacour: Walkin' The Bullfrog (CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7160

the very last 1 available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(2008/NIGHT TRAIN) 25 tracks (71:27) Rare and unreleased Chicago and Louisiana Outsider Rock & Roll 1956-79 from the vaults of Academy, Lucky Four, Magig Touch, Cralen Corp., Kader & Spotlight. Contains all 3 versions of Rock & Roll...
$29.63
Unreleased (CD)
Ray Charles: Unreleased (CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7154

the very last 2 available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

A collection of alternate takes, false starts, and incomplete versions. For collectors, only.
$17.75
Live At Tipitina's '78 (CD)
Tuts Washington: Live At Tipitina's '78 (CD) Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7101

the very last 1 available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(1998/Night Train) 19 Tracks (59:02) - Recorded live at Tipitina's, New Orleans, La., 1978 - Soundboard recordings!
$35.56
Bobby Mitchell & The Toppers - I'm Gonna Be A Wheel Someday (CD)
Bobby Mitchell: Bobby Mitchell & The Toppers - I'm Gonna Be A... Art-Nr.: CDNTICD7079

the very last 1 available
Ready to ship today, delivery time** appr. 1-3 workdays

(1996/NIGHT TRAIN) 18 tracks (41:10) 1953-63 IMPERIAL SHOW BIZ & RIP
$23.69